Matt Payne Photography Blog: Deepscapes & Nuclear Physics - A Conversation With Paul Schmit

June 23, 2021

Welcome to episode 218 of F-Stop Collaborate and Listen!

This week on the podcast I was joined by a nuclear physicist and night photographer extraordinaire, Paul Schmit.

Paul is one of the first people I became aware of using an interesting night photography technique known as Deepscapes, which we talk about on this week's show. He's also a father of two and is busy working on a way to provide the world with nearly limitless energy through nuclear fusion and so we discuss the interplay of his science life, his family life, and his photography life.

Paul and I also discuss:

  • Why he has chosen night photography as his main photography passion.
  • How he captured the International Space Station transiting across the rising sun.
  • How he approaches composition of deep sky objects as related to landscape objects.
  • Why he values a more authentic approach to chasing and capturing the night sky.
  • And HEAPS more!

    Be sure to scroll down to see all of Paul's amazing photographs!

    Here's who Paul recommended for the podcast this week:

    Other items mentioned on the show:

    1. Clubhouse Club for the Podcast.

    2. Natural Landscape Photography Awards.

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    Please find a transcript of this week's episode below: